2016 Tour of Solar Homes
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Homes on the 2017 Tour


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2017

Home 1
Victorian home with 2.8 kW roof mounted solar electric which provides 1/4 of electricity, grid tied battery backup. The rest is purchased as wind power from our local utility. Monthly electric bill for this 4000 square foot house including the fully used basement, is $125. 16 batteries provide 24 hours of backup in any weather for garage, basement, kitchen & family room, virtually unlimited with sun shining. A 2 rack Thermomax evacuated tube solar hot water with 2-80 gallon tanks provides 80% of hot water from solar, rest by propane backup. Energy star appliances. 95% fluorescent bulbs. Low flow toilets and faucets. Grasstrac and grassblock permeable driveway. Detached air conditioned garage is straw bale load bearing construction, with green roof, solar radiant heat combined with passive solar garage door. Garage stays over 60 degrees for all but 5-10 days per winter. Backup heating/cooling with portable propane/AC unit. Also has Incinolet toilet and bio based spray foam insulation.

Home 2
At 420 square feet, this compact, passive solar natural house qualifies as a tiny home, but that is not the best part! The diminutive size allowed the owner to incorporate several natural building techniques in a self-built guest cottage. A rubble-trench foundation and reclaimed bricks minimize carbon released during concrete production. The 6-inch thick adobe floor soaks up passive solar energy in the wintertime and releases it after the sun sets. Embedded hot water tubes use radiant energy to warm occupants silently and without blowing air that defeats efforts to stay warm. With no ducts, carpet or dreaded fiberglass insulation, the house is hypo-allergenic, and there is never any worry about what might be growing in the HVAC system. The super-insulated walls incorporate light straw clay infill, lime plaster, and clay plaster to mitigate temperature and humidity swings. Exterior material choices were made in expectation of a 50-year life-span before major replacements are needed. This will be a full-time residence until the lessons learned in this "Practice House" are incorporated into the main house, which is planned for a 2020 ground-breaking.

Home 3
Homemade southeast facing 8 kW 3-array ground mount solar system with added 8 kW southwest facing array sharing same inverters. Old house with new cast-iron radiator geothermal 6-ton heating system. Also heat-pump water heating. Three electric vehicles (EVs) and charging stations. Have reduced annual 3000 gallon equivalent of fossil fuel burning to less than 300 gallon per year (for Prius on trips). First solar-on-pier in the state. First ground-mount solar panels in the critical area. Solar boat.

Home 4
Annapolis Friends Meeting is striving to be carbon neutral. We were the first Maryland non-profit solar system in the critical area. Our ground mount solar system by Solar City made us grid neutral and then we replaced propane heating with a heatpump and are now adding another 6 kW to compensate. We have four EV charging outlets, plus rain barrels, on demand water heating and gravel parking. Just a mile from downtown annapolis, our facility is a great solar powered non-carbon meeting place.

Home 5
Our home has a 6.02 kW photovoltaic system leased from Solar City. There are 30 panels installed on two roof surfaces. The panels can withstand up to 130mph winds due to the manner in which they are installed. Each panel weighs slightly under 40 pounds which facilitated installation and meant that we did not have to reinforce our roof to support their weight. The panels are configured so that if any one panel is in shade, that panel no longer generates power, but the rest of the system continues to generate power. We drive a fully electric Nissan Leaf, two Toyota Prius hybrids, and are busy incorporating both edible plants into our landscape (blueberries, strawberries, asparagus, and herbs) and Maryland natives.

Home 6
This single family home has a 6.7 kW solar array on the roof that was installed in February this year. In the few months the system has been running it has produced more energy than has been used by the household.

Home 7
Installed 2 kW grid-tied PV system with 48 BP Millennium MST-43MVI amorphous modules and Xantrex Sun Tie XR 2.5kW inverter in 2001, using $3600 Maryland grant and 15% tax refund for total cost of $3625. We added Solatube tubular skylights, and LED and compact fluorescent lamps (CFL) throughout for lighting. Ceiling fans, tree shade and opening/closing windows and shades keeps the house cool much of the summer. We increased insulation and added ridge vents and replaced most windows and patio doors with Andersen low-E units following an IR scan by Infrared Predictive Surveys, Inc. In 2011, we replaced a failing gas furnace and electric AC with a Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) geothermal system with two 225 foot wells and Bosch TA035 furnace. Price of $20,825 minus $1500 state grant, 30% federal credit, and $5k county property credit for total of $8077 is comparable to a regular (high efficiency) furnace and AC, and uses one quarter of the energy. In 2012, we contracted with Energy Services Group to perform an energy audit with blower door test, and then add attic insulation (R49) including around SolaTubes, attic door insulation, and seal and insulate the walls, around foundation and other leaks (R19) ($3100-Pepco rebate $1500 and 30% tax rebate). Also installed The Energy Detective (TED) energy monitoring display. Grid electricity is 100% wind from WGL via Groundswell.org. Also have water-efficient shower heads and Toto toilets, rain barrel and compost bins.

Home 8
The owners installed a small PV system in 2002 with a grant from the state of Maryland. Solar tube skylights decrease the need for lights in the central bathroom and kitchen. High efficiency LED bulbs replaced most CFLs in light fixtures and lamps. Ceiling fans have energy-saving blades with dimmable fluorescent bulbs. Insulated window quilts and Roman shades protect the home from air infiltration, and automatic sensor-activated faucets help conserve water. Four high efficiency ductless heat pumps dehumidify the downstairs and air condition the upstairs in the summer, and heat both floors in the winter. A heat pump water heater provides hot water efficiently. Cooking outside with a portable solar oven on summer days, or the chimney-style charcoal grill decreases the load on hot summer days. An electric vehicle charging station on the exterior wall charges the Ford C-Max energi plug-in hybrid vehicle. Compost bins convert the household's food scraps into good soil. The front lawn is being turned into edible landscaping consisting so far of blueberry, raspberry, elderberry and wild blackberry bushes. In the works: refurbish the deck with composite decking and installing rain barrels, innovative Sense home energy and solar monitor, and Nebia Shower System that blends a steam room experience with a traditional shower, achieving 70% water savings.

Home 9
This ranch-style brick home was built in the late 50s. Solar City installed a 10 kW DC (8.9 kW AC) PV system on the E/SE facing slopes of the roof in early 2014 and it began generating electricity in November; there were no upfront costs. A 640-gallon cistern, manufactured in Australia, is installed under a second-story porch and is attached to a soaker hose that runs through an extensive garden with a large fish pond and waterfall. My property slopes steeply toward Greenbelt Lake and water runoff from neighbors has sometimes been a severe problem. Patuxent Nursery custom landscape designed and constructed a dry riverbed ending in a rain garden/bowl backed by large boulders to funnel and capture stormwater runoff. The next year we expanded on this system.

Home 10
We had our home built in 1992. No unusual energy conservation features were built into the house at that time. In 2015, we attended a meeting given by MD SUN, a nonprofit organization that provides technical assistance and helps organize groups of homeowners to buy solar panels and installation at a discount. Our solar panels were installed at the end of May, 2016. Recently we bought an electric car. Both purchases are eligible for Federal and State tax credits.

Home 11
Owner designed and built. Passive solar geothermal. earth-sheltered, shaped like a truncated isosceles triangle. 445 sq ft south glazing with movable insulation. 12 in thick concrete walls extend 6 ft below floor. Thermal mass consists of 684,000 lbs of concrete, 536,000 lbs of rock, 200,000 lbs of earth (722 tons of thermal mass total), and 24,500 lbs rebar from recycled automobiles. Wood stoves provide backup heat. Summer cooling by passive thermal conduction to earth and dehumidification by conventional window air conditioner. Rock bin is outside of the house and under the berm providing 2,000 sq ft contact area with adjoining earth. R 35 walls, R 38 + R 50 ceiling insulation. Low pollution design by selection of building materials and by low pollution heating and cooling. 4 to 6 ft of earth buffer weather conditions 4 to 6 months out of phase. Air wells are used to harvest early fall ambient heat and early spring ambient coolness by pumping air into rock bin. Low plastic, low formaldehyde house. Putting earth over the roof for insulation did not make economic sense, so the earth sheltering is done without earth over the roof. 100% battery electric car. Solar hot water heating is via evacuated tubes. No surface water discharge from site.

Home 12
The owners have a 33 panel photovoltaic array, and dual geothermal heat pumps. The home also has an array of solar windows in the great room, (totaling almost 12 feet high and 30 feet across), with stone (slate) floors for thermal mass to radiate heat back into the home once the sun sets, and an energy-saving metal roof. All appliances are low energy, CFL lighting where possible. Porous driveway minimizes runoff. Window quilts over the solar windows prevent heat loss in winter at night, shades great room. This home is custom designed by Ruhsam Building and Design and was completed in May 2012. It has stonework inside and out for added thermal mass. The great room stone floor remains warm overnight. The PV system generates more power than is used some months. An LP gas generator provides power during outages. Dual geothermal systems mitigates weather temperature extremes, lowers heating and cooling costs and provides hot water to the residence.

Home 13
We are building an urban homestead, meeting most of our energy needs from local solar power. We generate 100% of our electricity using 4.4 kW solar panels, and using energy efficient lighting and appliances. We heat our house nearly 100% with our high efficiency Vermont Castings catalytic wood stove with salvaged local wood. With nearly 450 gallons of rainwater catchment capacity in 3 rain barrels, we are able to keep water usage low. We eat fresh produce from our property, harvesting fruit from our persimmon, plum, cherry, pear and fig trees, blueberry bushes, hardy kiwi and raspberry, concord grapes, and an organic vegetable garden.

Home 14
This home is one of the greenest in Washington, D.C. with environmental features in energy efficiency, solar generation, food composting, waste reduction, storm-water runoff mitigation, clean transportation, and habitat conservation.

Home 15
The solar electricity solution was designed and installed by Astrum Solar (Now "Direct Energy Solar"). The project was funded as a 20 year lease, with a single upfront payment and upfront pass through of various tax incentives and energy credits to the home owner. System health and power generation can be monitored in real time through an Enphase PC or mobile phone app. The installed solution can be viewed using Google Earth. The solar electricity solution incorporates 29 Solar World 240 Watt panels, with power gathered through M215 Enphase Energy microinverters located on each panel. The panels are have a zero degree incline, to assure approval of the Georgetown and Washington DC approval authorities. The solution provides move than half of the household annual electricity needs - and does make the meter run backward two months a year.

Home 16
This three story brick colonial was built in 1959 with minimal insulation (brick over cinder block), forced air gas furnace, and central AC. The upper stories were uncomfortably warm in summer months. In recent years, we added PV panels on the south-facing roof and supplemented it with "thin-film" solar strips on north roof. At the same time, we replaced old shingle roof with standing-seam steel roof with underlying closed-cell insulation (federal tax credit for both). The PV panels also shade the steel roof, reducing our air conditioning need. With the electricity generation, our hybrid car mileage is 70 MPG. We put in eight large rain barrels to capture roof runoff and reduce river pollution. The windows were replaced with insulated, double pane windows, along with HVAC ductwork sealing. We made indoor air quality a priority by using an indoor air filter.

Home 17
Current owners of a custom, contemporary shed style, stick-frame home built in 1978 have worked to reduce their carbon footprint. Ideas and examples for any homeowner, from DIY to fully-engineered, professionally-installed solutions. Utilizing techniques such as air sealing and insulating, moving from storage to instantaneous water heating, efficient appliances and LED lighting, installation of an award-winning Hybrid Photovoltaic and Solar Thermal system that provides full HVAC services, DHW, and complete digital diagnostics, monitoring, and logging, and a plug-in hybrid vehicle. Run-off is minimized and managed, to ensure that impacts to the environment are mitigated as much as possible along with the use of native and edible plantings.

Home 18
The house is a 1926 Sears and Roebuck bungalow with a second story addition designed by the Owner/Architect. Grid tied solar panels are located on the high roof. A stand-alone system powers the porch using PV panels, a pair of deep-cycle batteries, and a controller. This off-grid arrangement furnishes light for the porch, refrigeration for cold drinks and power to pump water from a 300 gallon rainwater harvest cistern.

Home 19
house was 3 years old when purchased in 1975. The homeowners immediately began to retrofit with super insulation. Insulation was completed in 1983 at which time the furnace was turned OFF. Furnace not needed until 1990 when they became Empty Nesters. The problem is no central furnace OR AC made, even apartment size, is small enough. 2006 Solar Hot Water. 2012 - Solar Electric. Annual energy bills $550 - $600.We will make presentations at 10 AM, 1 PM & 3 PM.After giving presentations for over 20 years, we have met and exchanged information with various professionals in this field.

Home 20
Originally constructed in 2007 with an addition by Windmill Hill in 2014, the house is designed to be as efficient and environmentally friendly as possible without compromising on architecture or functionality. The concrete slab with SIP construction and the triple pane windows enable effective passive and active solar heating of the home. The narrow footprint of the home is designed for air movement, and the owners have used wood milled from the property, salvaged architectural pieces, recycled components and other environmentally friendly finishes. Outside the environmentally friendly features include a living roof, a native species yard, Audubon at home certification, a rain garden, and a hybrid car. The result is a beautiful home with many advanced technologies that keep the environmental footprint low. The addition was designed by Peter Henry with passive house standards in mind.

Home 21
Home originally built in the 1960s. Second story added in 2000 by current owner. Solar panels installed in October 2015. Energy efficiency upgrades through out. Recently remodeled basement with cork flooring and with energy efficiency at the forefront of the plan. Native plants and an extensive vegetable garden. Rain barrels.

Home 22
This brick-front colonial style house was built around 1993. In May 2013 the homeowner had a 10 kW grid-tied PV system (LG Mono-X panels and Enphase inverters) installed.The home is in an HOA-controlled community that is solar friendly. Locating the panels on the back of the roof also made approval easier.

Home 23
The pole-mounted PV array uses both net-metering and battery backup. Solar thermal blinds and very efficient interior storm windows. Kitchen floorboards are repurposed oak from a barn which are cleaned and treated with a wax mixture that avoids traditional polyurethane coating. A wood burning stove produces heat and some wonderful cooked items. The solar thermal system is designed so that the domestic hot water is supplied by solar using a multi energy tank. The excess heat is pumped back into the pool extending the pool season. The owners enjoy their Nissan Leaf.

Home 24
Grace, beauty, and ecological integrity. These are the principles embodied in the Earth Ministry Simple Gifts project at Dayspring. There are 2 small staff cottages and a solar strawbale greenhouse. Each cottage is 1250 square feet and is designed to provide a well-crafted and energy-efficient home. The cottages accomplished this in different ways including passive solar heating and cooling, well-insulated walls and roof, top energy-efficient windows and appliances, insulating window shades, living roof, FSC-certified framing lumber, geothermal/radiant heating and cooling, grid-tied and grid-independent PV, solar hot water, masonry heater, oak and cherry trim from trees on the land, earth plaster and milk paint wall finishes, stained concrete slab floors, bamboo and linoleum floors, fiber-cement composite siding and trim, roof water collection, and landscaping with native plants.

Home 25
The 21st century farm house at Red Wiggler Community Farm was the UMD Solar Decathlon entry in 2005. Installed on the Ovid Hazen Wells Park in 2008, the 51 panels on the Solar House have generated more power than it uses year after year while being lived in continuously. As a result Red Wiggler, a certified Organic farm, converted one of its low horse power tractors to electric to use some of the excess power. The 1947 Allis Chalmbers G with its new electric motor is now a working example of scale appropriate technology powered by the sun. The home also features solar water heating, triple-pane windows and doors, radiant in-floor heating, and used sustainably harvested wood and bamboo in the construction. The home was designed by an interdisciplinary team of University of Maryland students in architecture, engineering and related fields, and built by students and partners. The home took the "People's Choice" Award at the 2005 Decathlon and was donated to Red Wiggler by UMD. The house is now a full-time residence for farm staff.

Home 26
Built in the early 1990's, this single family home was upgraded with a 6.845 kW grid-tied solar array in late 2010. During the summer of 2013 an expansion of the solar system increased the size of the solar array to a 15.1 kW system. Both systems use Enphase microinverters and feature web-based monitoring. In 2012 a Geothermal system was added to provide heating and cooling. The system produces all of the electricity needed for the home plus additional electricity to support an electric car. The owner has extensive data on energy usage and generation over time, plus information on efficiency and reduction of energy usage.

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2017

Home A
The home has 20 315 watt high efficiency mono-crystalline PV modules (LG315N1C-G4 rectangular array) on southwest facing roof. The array provides >100% electricity consumption offset (net-metered). LED lighting. SolarEdge inverter is compatible with energy storage system, planned for purchase in 2019 alongside EV. pickmysolar.com

Home B
Annapolis Friends Meeting is striving to be carbon neutral. We were the first Maryland non-profit solar system in the critical area. Our ground mount solar system by Solar City made us grid neutral and then we replaced propane heating with a heatpump and are now adding another 6 kW to compensate. We have four EV charging outlets, plus rain barrels, on demand water heating and gravel parking. Just a mile from downtown annapolis, our facility is a great solar powered non-carbon meeting place.

Home C
Strawbale house completed in 2010. Strawbale construction in three walls with deep overhangs to protect lime plaster from the elements. The south wall is insulated passive solar design with blown in cellulose insulation. Earthen plaster interior finished with homemade (zero VOC) clay paints. Site-harvested trees create primary exposed support columns and beams. Extensive use of site harvested/milled timber used for both structural and trim features. Concrete countertops. Wood burning stove. Geothermal system for heating, cooling, and domestic hot water. Acid-stained concrete slab on ground floor for radiant floor heating and thermal mass for passive solar heat. House-mounted trellis keeps summer sun from reaching concrete slab. A remote 3.5 kW photovoltaic system is grid-tied with battery backup system. Permaculture landscaping with multi-fruit orchard, mushroom cultivation. Sculpture garden with 45 works by artist Pat Monk. Farm in Agricultural Preservation program. Chickens and goats.

Home D
Original 1920s gable frame house was gutted and retrofit with strawbales. A timberframe addition was added to one end of the house and infilled with strawbales for insulation. A small loadbearing strawbale guesthouse was built by Builders Without Borders using lime and earth plasters and as featured outside the Capital building for almost a year. A small studio using a modified infill system was built and finished in local clay plasters. A variety of strawbale and plastering techniques were used in the structures from low to high-end. Boards, timbers and posts were obtained locally and milled using our sawmill or chainsaw. Lots of experiments in local reused materials, and timbers, trees, and found objects. Key themes are local natural materials, do it your self, low cost, and non-manufactured.

Home E
3.7 kW solar panels are installed on the front roof of the house. The garage has two charge ports for Plug-in Hybrids.

Home F
Our roof's 5.8 kW PV was installed in April 2012 and provides, on average, 60 to 80 percent of the electricity for the house. On some days, producing more than we use. Home features energy saving appliances, CFL lighting and super insulation in the attic. Other alt fuel features include a Prius, a 144 volt electric Ford Escort, electric powered dragster and a GE Elec-Trak garden tractor.

Home G
The home features a number of energy-saving measures, solar panels, and organic gardening practices in place. During the tour, you'll see rain barrels and rain water diversion, a compost station, and several cold frames for growing food during colder months. The property is surrounded by organic gardening beds, including strawberries as ground cover, and blueberries as a fence. The homeowner also diverts rain from the gutters into a garden, to minimize the need for watering with municipal water. The house features 17 solar panels and a 14Kw natural gas generator. During the last roof repair conducted at the property, the owner elected to have foam insulation installed in the roof, which cuts down on noise, and keeps the house warm in winter, and cool in summer. The yard is planted with zoisa grass, which is drought tolerant and stays green during the hottest months. Finally, the homeowner completely upgraded the property with energy efficient windows. All in all, this property features a practical, fun, and simple combination of energy saving solutions, including solar panels, energy efficient upgrades, and organic gardening and landscaping practices that blend harmoniously with modern surburban living.

Home H
8 PV panels leased from Solar City NEST thermostat free from Solar City. Had to have a large tree cut down. It was dying. System installed in January 2017. 20% of energy from the sun. Terraced yard gardens aplenty. Channel and collect water to water barrel. Andersen windows, double pane for efficiency. On the PEPCO 75% savings for powering down during peak periods.

Home I
This 5-unit apartment house has a solar water heater consisting of 4 panels and 2 80-gallon storage tanks. The system preheats the conventional electric water heater saving significant energy costs. All common area lighting uses efficient fluorescent lights. An ultrasonic switch in the main hall turns on automatically when people enter and turns off 5 minutes after sensing no movement in the room. A garage light is also automatic. 2 solar powered roof vents remove heat from the attic, reducing the air-conditioning load. These improvements have lowered electric usage from 800 kWh to 300 kWh per month.

Home J
Built in 2000, this single family home has been upgraded over the past 8 years, starting with an energy audit, and includes the following: attic insulation upgraded to DoE recommended R49, recessed light sealing, along with high efficiency AC upgrade. Lighting upgraded to 95% LED. 2200+ sq ft of strand bamboo flooring. Energy Star appliance replacements installed as needed and automatic lighting controls help ensure lights are off when not in use. Finished basement multi-purpose room & bath showcases energy & water efficient fixtures with sustainably sourced materials throughout. The home boasts a 69 panel net-positive solar installation handling over 100% of the household & Electric Vehicle needs. The installation consists of two solar panel arrays: a 12.5kW 52 panel array leased in 2013 and a 4.2kW 17 panel array bought in 2014, both grid-tied. A Nissan LEAF Electric Car and a Chevy Volt Extended Range Electric Car complete the picture. The homeowners have been driving electric since 2011. Extensive data collection on the solar array energy production and electric car usage is available for review.

Home K
I have been greening my home for several years and will have been off the grid since March 2016. Other features -- novel uses of pilot lights to recover energy for heating water and dehydrating food, Tempcast masonry stove, SunDanzer refrigerator and freezer, inflector panels on some windows and on 2 skylights, a manual grey water recovery system for dish washing,one window quilt, mini-split AC in 4 areas, passive ventilation with venting skylights.

Home L
Rooftop system on a row house, 15 panels, 250 kw each. Happy to talk numbers.

Home M
This three story brick colonial was built in 1959 with minimal insulation (brick over cinder block), forced air gas furnace, and central AC. The upper stories were uncomfortably warm in summer months. In recent years, we added PV panels on the south-facing roof and supplemented it with "thin-film" solar strips on north roof. At the same time, we replaced old shingle roof with standing-seam steel roof with underlying closed-cell insulation (federal tax credit for both). The PV panels also shade the steel roof, reducing our air conditioning need. With our own electricity generation, our hybrid car mileage is 70 MPG. We put in eight large rain barrels to capture roof runoff and reduce river pollution.The windows were replaced with insulated, double pane windows, along with HVAC ductwork sealing and repair. Indoor air quality is a priority with an air filter.

Home N
The house is a 1926 Sears and Roebuck bungalow with a second story addition designed by the Owner/Architect. Grid tied solar panels are located on the high roof. A stand-alone system powers the porch using PV panels, a pair of deep-cycle batteries, and a controller. This off-grid arrangement furnishes light for the porch, refrigeration for cold drinks and power to pump water from a 300 gallon rainwater harvest cistern.

Home O
This 1920s Sears kit home was re-retrofited in 1985 and again in 1993 to incorporate R38 insulation, double-paned low-e glass, geothermal (direct exchange) heat pump, solar water heater, and various types of photovoltaics (including peal-and-stick pv)
dedicated to a battery bank. The back office building has solar roofing shingles-small wind turbine-and a hydrogen fuel cell all tied to a web-enabled battery bank with solar daylighting, super insulating glass and LEDs. Three drop-and-play solar units and a demo van with PV/wind and carbon, super-capacitor batteries.

Home P
Net Zero Passive House. This house was designed and constructed in 2013 to meet the Passive House standard. The result was an all-electric house with very low energy requirements. The addition of 18 solar PV panels provides more than the total annual energy used for heating, cooling and electrical use. The shell of the house is very air-tight (0.55 ach50 blower door test result) and the walls are insulated with dense-packed cellulose insulation to R-40 and the attic is insulated to R-90. The house uses so little energy that it is heated and cooled with a small heat pump which is designed to heat and cool one room in a standard house but heats and cools all of this home's 3400 sf. The home's focus is a passive solar 2 story dining room. Extremely modern in construction but with a classic character, the space's natural lighting is superb. Fresh air is continually provided through an energy efficient ERV. Windows and doors are triple glazed and have multipoint locks to maintain a tight seal. South side shading has been designed to take advantage of solar gain in the cool seasons and to exclude it when hot. The hot water is provided by a GE heat pump water heater. All lights are LED. Appliances are all Energy-Star efficient. 

Home Q
Home originally built in the 1960s. Second story added in 2000 by current owner. Solar panels installed in October 2015. Energy efficiency upgrades throughout. Recently remodeled basement with cork flooring and with energy efficiency at the forefront of the plan. Native plants and an extensive vegetable garden and rain barrels.

Home R
This 2250 sq. ft Ryan home built in 1981, has achieved a carbon-neutral footprint with a combination of a 13.3 kW PV system, solar heated water, geothermal heat pump, Energy Star appliances, LED and CFL lighting, Tesla Model S EV, and upgraded insulation. The original 1850 sq ft home sports a 2011 addition with high efficiency windows, 2x6 R-27 walls and R-63 ceiling.

Home S
This contemporary, 2950 square feet, frame structure has 83% south-facing windows and skylights. A solar-powered greenhouse fan distributes heat into the house in winter and exhausts heat in summer. A vertical closed-loop geothermal system and a high velocity air-to-air system provide heating and cooling. An efficient Finnish fireplace allows the owners to enjoy a fire. Insulation includes R19 fiberglass bats in the 6 inch walls, R13 fiberglass bats with R3.8 polystyrene in the 4 inch walls, and R30 fiberglass bats in the ceilings. An air-lock foyer entry, Tyvek wrap, and foam caulking reduce air infiltration. Windows are of low-E thermopane glass. Skylights and a Solatube provide daylighting, and the electric lighting is fluorescent. Clerestory windows allow natural ventilation. Other energy-savers include a timer on the water heater and low-flow shower heads. The house is currently on the market.

 


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